Youtube video 23 – Spirit of Place

Kitty has a bee in her bonnet!

The time has come to clear the air and take a look at one of the foundations of believing and understanding Faerie Folklore: Spirit of Place.

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Traditional Irish and Celtic Folklore doesn’t bark or harangue us.
It seeps, quietly, into the corners of our mind and memories.
It speaks to each of us without prejudice.

In this episode, Kitty ponders the experience of being an Irish, or Celtic, descendant and asks:
Is it wrong, or offensive, for someone outside of Ireland to discuss Irish Folklore?

Why do millions of Americans, Canadians and Australians feel such a powerful connection to the homeland of their Ancestors.

What is Spirit of Place anyway, and what’s it got to do with Ancestral Memory?

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As always, Kitty explains why it’s okay to feel passionately about the homeland of your Ancestors and encourages everyone to relax and keep an open mind.

Read stories of encounters with the Good People, and share your own story of an encounter or perhaps one handed down through your family at www.encounterswiththegoodpeople.com . You can contact Kitty at www.glassonionstories@gmail.com

Or, see what Kitty’s been getting up to at
www.facebook.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople

and

www.instagram.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople

and

twitter.com/encountersthe

Credits

Theme Music:

‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo.

Excerpt from ‘Four Green Fields’ written by Tommy Makem. Read by Mark.

Excerpt from ‘Caledonia’ written by Dougie Maclean. Read by Simone.

Additional Music:

‘Caoineadh Cu Chulainn’ performed by Davy Spillane.
‘Banish Misfortune’ by Brigan.

Youtube video 22 – Extreme Acts of Faerie Kindness

What keeps Tinkerbell awake at night?
Wee Billy’s lost homework? Or sweet Jane’s knotted piggy-tails?
Does all this worry give her worry-wrinkles?
Yes, yes and probably not.
But, what do the Faerie of Ireland worry about?
Do they step in and help wee Billy, or sweet Jane, or are they preoccupied with worrying about deforestation? urban sprawl? or tyrannical leaders? Of course, kindness can take many forms and proportions. We know the Good People often help those who have helped one of their own, a farmer here, a bus-driver there… but is it possible the Good People help their Human neighbours during times of great crisis or chaos? This week, Kitty takes a look at an old story of Faerie lending a helping hand during Irelands darkest days and ponders if this is more common than we ever imagined. Kitty explains why it’s not only okay to believe in Faeries, but how believing will fill your mind and heart with wonder.
To read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience, drop in and say hi to Kitty at: www.encounterswiththegoodpeople.com glassonionstories@gmail.com www.facebook.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople www.instagram.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople twitter.com/encountersthe
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Credits:
‘If I can stop one heart from breaking’ poem by Emily Dickinson. 1864
‘Love is all’ song by Roger Glover – 1974. Based on ‘‘The Butterfly’s Ball, and the Grasshopper’s Feast’ poem written by William Roscoe, 1802
Theme Music:
‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo.
Additional Music:
‘Irish Green’ by Myers Music
‘Cloudy’ by Vladimir Khrobystov

Youtube video 20 – The Old Hag

Faerie of traditional Irish Faerie Folklore are old and clever, and know how to drive us insane… slowly.

The Good People are blamed for very many things, some just, others unjust. So it is, the wise among us know to keep an open mind.

In this episode, Kitty lifts the lid on Sleep Paralysis, also known as, Old Hag Syndrome and asks:

If the condition of Sleep Paralysis can be explained by science why is it so many people witness the very same ‘Old Hag’?
Why does she attack in similar ways?
How do we explain the condition when a second person witnesses the attack?
Why is it so common to be ‘Hag Rode’ in Newfoundland?

To get to the bottom of the mystery, we look at several first-hand encounters as well as witness accounts and ponder why the Old Hag targets particular people to attack while they sleep.

Have they offended the Good People in some way? Do Old Hags attach themselves to families, following members of the family wherever they go and attacking for no other apparent reason?

As always, Kitty explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries and invites you to read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience.

Visit Kitty at:
www.encounterswiththegoodpeople.com
www.facebook.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople
www.instagram.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople
twitter.com/encountersthe
glassonionstories@gmail.com

CREDITS:
‘The Hag’ Poem. Written by Robert Herrick (1591-1674). Read by Simon.
‘Away with the Fairies’ Poem. Written by Douglas McClarty. Read by Simon.
Celtic Life Magazine. June 2019 edition: https://celticlife.com/
Michael Fortune: www.facebook.com/folklore.ie/

Theme Music:
‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo.

Additional Music:
‘Deep Horrors’ by Kevin McCloud.
‘Darkest Child’ by Kevin McCloud.

Youtube video 19 – Beware the Faerie Ring

Beware the Faerie Ring

Faerie of traditional Irish Faerie Folklore are old and clever, and love to hang out within a ring of mushrooms. But what are they doing in there? We know they dance, but what else do they get up to?

The wise among us have long been cautious of venturing near a Faerie Ring, the time has come to figure out why.

In this episode, Kitty looks at true accounts of people who have entered a Faerie Ring and lived to tell the tale, (if only for a short time).

We discover that punishment for stepping within a Faerie Ring is swift and grave, and ponder what the Good People are doing within their beloved rings to demand such a harsh response.

Are they really only dancing?
Or could they be: settling a dispute; giving birth; planning sabotage; having a clan reunion; or conducting commerce?

As always, Kitty explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries and invites you to read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience visit Kitty at:

www.encounterswiththegoodpeople.com
glassonionstories@gmail.com
www.facebook.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople
www.instagram.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople

Credits:
‘Thousands are Sailing’ written by Phil Chevron. From the album ‘Bringing it all back home’. Produced by Donal Lunny. 1991.
‘The Tale of Rhys and Llewellyn’ read by Zed.

Theme Music:
‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo
‘Fairytale’ and ‘Forest of the Elves’ by Jonathan Segev.

Youtube video 18 – 3 Tales of Faerie from the sea

Wee Pocket Podcast – 3 Tales of Faerie from the Sea
Sit back and relax as Kitty shares 3 rare and engaging tales of Faerie from the Sea. Listen to the tale of how a quick-witted and wickedly handsome man managed to escape the clutches of a lusty Mermaid. Discover how one fella learned the hard way that you should never invade the privacy, or threaten to expose the identity, of a Merman. And finally, see how one man’s act of kindness toward a Selkie came to save many lives. * To read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience with Kitty at:
www.encounterswiththegoodpeople.com
glassonionstories@gmail.com www.facebook.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople www.instagram.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople
Credits: Theme Music, ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo.
Mermaid Tale: read by Lynda. Merman Tale: read by Simon.

Youtube video 17 – Household Faerie

Household Faerie – More than a helping hand.

We look at 3 tales of encounters with Household Faerie.

The German “Kobold”, the Welsh “Bwbachod”, the Scottish “Brownie”.

Kitty reminds you, as always, why it’s okay to believe in Faeries.

To read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience visit:

www.encounterswiththegoodpeople.com
glassonionstories@gmail.com
www.facebook.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople

Credits:
Theme Music:
‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo

Additional Music:
‘Galway’ by Kevin McLeod. From Royalty Free Zone.
Brownie story read by Zornaph. www.fiverr.com/zornaph/

Youtube video 16 – Will o’Wisp, Red Cap and Sluagh

Faerie of traditional Celtic Faerie Folklore are old and clever, and sometimes bloodthirsty.

It is long known the Good People are more active in the month of May. Until they tell us themselves, we can only speculate why this is so but… we are wise to be wary, for not all Faerie wish to act as Guardian, or Muse, or kindly foretell a death at any time.

And in the month of May, there are those who would gladly steal your blood or even your life.

We look at 2 tales of encounters with Faerie in the month of May which show us how easily they are tempted by a lovely lady and how swift, and final, is their reckoning when a promise is broken. The line twixt life and death is fine indeed…

This episode features 3 particularly dangerous Faerie: the Will o’Wisp, Red Cap and Sluagh.

These are three fellas you do not want to bump into at any time, but in the month of May, that bump would surely turn deadly. But fear not, we have some tips on how you might save yourself from their wicked whimsies.

Kitty reminds you not to be tempted to go Faerie Spotting in the month of May and as always, explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries.

To read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience visit:

www.encounterswiththegoodpeople.com
glassonionstories@gmail.com
www.facebook.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople

Credits:
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo
Additional Music: ‘Caoineadh Cu Chulainn’ written by Bill Whelan from the album ‘Riverdance’, 1997. Performed by Davy Spillane.
‘Sweet Little Lullaby’ by Darren Curtis. From Royalty Free Zone.
‘Ghost’ by Tim Beek. From Royalty Free Zone.
Anecdote collected by Scottish author John Francis Campbell in 1862. Read by Zornaph. www.fiverr.com/zornaph/
Poem ‘Will o’Wisp’, published in Scottish Broadsheet in 1869. Read by Greyolltwit.
Tale ‘The Fairy Rath’, collected by Lady Wilde in 1887. Read by Greyolltwit.

Youtube video 15 – Beltane and the Month of Faerie Madness

What do you get when you take a pinch of Beltane and add a dash of Faerie?

A Month of May Mischief.

Faerie of traditional Irish Faerie Folklore are old and clever, and something strange comes over them in the month of May.

Did you know that in the month of May you are more likely to be assaulted, abducted, seduced or tricked by Faerie than at any other time of the year? It’s true, and Kitty is wondering why!

We know the Good People, Wee Folk, Faerie or Sidhe are all around us and watching, always watching. And so it is they watch us celebrate birth and mourn death and the many landmarks twixt the two.

But what do the Good People think when they witness us collectively throw off our tightly held inhibitions, ditch our clothing, paint our bodies, adorn them in flowers and branches, beat drums and dance around bonfires?

Are they amused? Probably, but they are most certainly confused.

Beltane, the Celtic ceremony of welcoming Summer and celebrating the warmth of the Sun and the fertility and hope it brings, is held on 30th April, and it is no coincidence that from 1st May, Faerie go a little wild.

Kitty has some ideas why, warns against Faerie Spotting in the month of May and as always, explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries.

To read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience visit:

www.encounterswiththegoodpeople.com
glassonionstories@gmail.com
www.facebook.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople

Credits:
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo
Additional Music: ‘Birdsong in Spring’ by Sounds Majestic.
Additional Music: ‘Carousel’ by Free Video Library.
‘A Chant for Beltane’ poem, written by Doreen Valiente, read by Dreow Bennett from the DVD, ‘Charge of the Goddess’.

Youtube video 14 – Selkie

Selkie – Still Waters Run Deep.

Come, join Kitty and bask under the warm glow of the doe-eyed Selkie.

The Selkie story is a familiar one: under the light of the moon, a beautiful woman with milky white skin, long brown hair and big brown eyes, dances on the rocky shore. A canny man steals her sealskin and she is evermore bound to live on land, to be his wife and bear his children. She is a fine wife, a loving mother and, although she spends every spare moment gazing out at sea and talking to seagulls, theirs is a good life.

NUTS TO THAT!

It’s time to wipe the misty romanticism from our eyes and take a real look at Selkie. Her predicament is no fairytale.

Faerie of traditional Folklore are old, clever and can shed their skin whole. They are all around us, always watching. But what are they thinking? Do they yearn to befriend us?

It is said “still waters run deep” and so it is with Selkie, the ‘feel-good’ member of the Good People.

Kitty takes a close look at these romanticised creatures to discover the fascinating character bubbling beneath those soft brown eyes. You might be surprised to find we have plenty in common with the creatures who have long dwelled in the waters off Scotland and Ireland.

In this episode we ponder:

the true nature of the Selkie
the shocking methods used to treat webbed hands and feet of those descended from a Selkie-Human union.
one rare occasion of Selkie revenge
and tips on where best to spot Selkie.

As always, Kitty explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries and invites you to read more true tales of encounters with the Good People and share your own experiences at:

www.encounterswiththegoodpeople.com
glassonionstories@gmail.com
www.instagram.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople
www.facebook.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople

Credits:
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo.
Poem adapted from ‘The Mermaid Song’ written by James Reeves. Read by Owen.
Poem adapted from ‘Tell me, tell me, Sarah Jane’ written by Charles Causley. Read by Carol.
Additional Music: ‘Sea Waves’ by superfunnysheet