21 – Amadan: The Dark Fool of Madness

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Faerie of traditional Irish Faerie Folklore are old and clever, and far from perfect.

In fact, one of their own is so insane he is believed to be the most dangerous, and terrifying of them all. Forget your Red Cap, Sluagh and Black Shuck, the Amadan is the most dreaded of all the Good People.

He is erratic, attacking randomly. One touch from the Amadan will paralyse the body and turning your minds insane. And guess what?… he is most prevalent in the month of June.

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In this episode, Kitty ponders why Amadan is let loose during June, looks at true accounts of people who have witnessed or fallen victim to the Amadan and asks:

Is it possible the Good People try to protect Humans from the Amadan?

Could we be the cause of his cursed madness?

Is there any way of defending ourselves from him (apart from running fast)?

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As always, Kitty explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries and invites you to read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience visit Kitty at:

Email: glassonionstories@gmail.com 

Facebook: Encounters with the Good People

Instagram: Encounters with the Good People

Credits
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo.
Additional Music: ‘Cursed Lullaby’ by Jonathan Segev.
‘Realm of Hope’ by Jonathan Segev.
‘Memories’ by Jonathan Segev.

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‘The Madman’ poem by Khalil Gibran (1918). Read by Zed. www.fiverr.com/zornaph
Lady Gregory read by Niamh.
‘Visions and Beliefs in the West of Ireland’ by Lady Augusta Gregory. Published 1920.
‘The Fairy Fellers Master Stroke’ by Richard Dadd. www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/dadd-the-fairy-fellers-master-stroke-t00598
‘The Fairy Fellers Master Stroke’ song by Queen. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEnMPurHYak

20 – The Old Hag

 

Faerie of traditional Irish Faerie Folklore are old and clever, and know how to drive us insane… slowly.

The Good People are blamed for very many things, some just, others unjust. So it is, the wise among us know to keep an open mind.

In this episode, Kitty lifts the lid on Sleep Paralysis, also known as, Old Hag Syndrome and asks:old hag3

If the condition of Sleep Paralysis can be explained by science why is it so many people witness the very same ‘Old Hag’?

Why does she attack in similar ways?

How do we explain the condition when a second person witnesses the attack?

Why is it so common to be ‘Hag Rode’ in Newfoundland?

old hag4To get to the bottom of the mystery, we look at several first-hand encounters as well as witness accounts and ponder why the Old Hag targets particular people to attack while they sleep.

Have they offended the Good People in some way?

Do Old Hags attach themselves to families, following members of the family wherever they go and attacking for no other apparent reason?

As always, Kitty explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries and invites you to read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, Visit Kitty at:

Email: glassonionstories@gmail.com 

Facebook: Encounters with the Good People

Instagram: Encounters with the Good People

 

CREDITS:

‘The Hag’ Poem. Written by Robert Herrick (1591-1674). Read by Simon.

‘Away with the Fairies’ Poem. Written by Douglas McClarty. Read by Simon.

Celtic Life Magazine. June 2019 edition: https://celticlife.com/

Michael Fortune: www.facebook.com/folklore.ie/

Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo.

Additional Music: ‘Old Hag’ performed by The Corrs. From the album ‘Home’, 2005.

‘Deep Horrors’ by Kevin McCloud.

‘Darkest Child’ by Kevin McCloud.

19 – Beware the Faerie Ring

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Faerie of traditional Irish Faerie Folklore are old and clever, and love to hang out within a ring of mushrooms. But what are they doing in there? We know they dance, but what else do they get up to?

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The wise among us have long been cautious of venturing near a Faerie Ring, the time has come to figure out why.

In this episode, Kitty looks at true accounts of people who have entered a Faerie Ring and lived to tell the tale, (if only for a short time).

We discover that punishment for stepping within a Faerie Ring is swift and grave, and ponder what the Good People are doing within their beloved rings to demand such a harsh response.

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Are they really only dancing?

Or could they be: settling a dispute; giving birth; planning sabotage; having a clan reunion; or conducting commerce?

As always, Kitty explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries and invites you to read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience visit Kitty at:

Email: glassonionstories@gmail.com 

Facebook: Encounters with the Good People

Instagram: Encounters with the Good People

Credits:
‘Thousands are Sailing’ written by Phil Chevron. From the album ‘Bringing it all back home’. Produced by Donal Lunny. 1991.

‘The Tale of Rhys and Llewellyn’ read by Zed. https://www.fiverr.com/zornaph

Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo

Additional Music: ‘If you see a Fairy Ring’ by Vitae.

Additional Music: ‘Fairytale’ and ‘Forest of the Elves’ by Jonathan Segev.

Faerie Encounter on the Isle of Man – John H.

John continues his Faerie spotting on the Isle of Man. He shares some of the old tales and his own incredible encounter with… something in the mist. 

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This part will feature the Fenoderee story and other tales.

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The Isle of Man map with the Area of interest

Just prior to entering the upper part of the Glen via a metal gate across the rough track, we explored a field and area right a large field and trackway path going up the side of Skye hill.

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Close up diagram of the walk and marked areas
from Milntown Corne

Here where, this derelict and dilapidated mill building lies were figures reported last century cloaked in Blue/Grey with a Gnome like appearance. Also, some youths where chased by a woman wielding what looked like a frying pan!

A more recent sighting was two English tourists reported seeing a small woman with a white bonnet on her head or white object which she took off and used it to wave off or warn off the tourists. They fled!

Andrew Green (the Ghosthunter) in one of his books wondered if the apparition could have a Norse origin with the type of headdress?

Whatever has been seen over the years seems to change its appearance to adopt popular images eg… Cloaked Gnome, Witchlike Woman, next could be a Grey Alien?

The Old building was wooden, open and falling down. I had a camera, a pre-digital Canon 35mil with a good lens and a full roll of colour film loaded. That’s 36 frames!

The Woman or figures had been seen in the field, tackmill and the pathway, coming down from Skye Hill described in Part 1.

I noticed that a house that was the last on the lane backed onto this field and without exception all the rear windows were boarded over! Makes me wonder if it was to stop the spectacle being seen or stop something looking in!

Also, up on top of the hill something described as a “Fairy City” had been seen. Strange lights on the Mountain looking like an illuminated palace were what would be termed as Spooklights now or even a UFO.

Local people tempted in by the singing, dancing, food, fine ladies and handsome men should always exercise caution by refusing all food and drink in case they were taken /abducted. Fairy Time runs different to terrestrial time.

The “Stray sod ” or being Pixy-led is also in evidence here, when you can become lost forever going in circles until the spell is broken by turning your clothes inside out, carrying religious items, uttering prayers, and some iron or steel.

The Fairy promise of beautiful people and glittering castles, amazing food can all be the product of a” Glamour” fooling the human senses and creating a false but enticing bait for people to become entrapped. If all the gifts are refused the person when they awake will find the food was mouldy leaves, and the Palace just a clump of grass.

Back on track through the metal gate on walking upward the river to our left the hill to our right. North Barrule Mt and road to our Left now, through a wooded glen of Oak trees and Pine trees to what I originally went looking for: The Blue leafed Rowan Oak tree of the Fenoderee story (of which this Glen is known in folklore stories).

Walking up, my friend observed a mist hanging over the area, I could hear the stream over the rocks tumbling down the valley making a kind of drumming noise and a certain musical sound I couldn’t place.

I found a typical mushroom ring by the stream as we continued walking up, the walk was taking up to half an hour or more, when we came to a dip in the path by a stonewall. Directly below was a huge pool of water from a recent rainstorm.

No way through it, to carry on we’ll have to skirt around going into the little wooded area.

Now, here’s where it gets strange… I mean you go out on walks and nothing ever happens!

Sure I ‘d spent a few days prior reading up on the folklore in the Manx Museum taking notes and then selecting a suitable location that seemed interesting for a walk on a non raceday.

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the General viewpoint of the Strange event experience

Just before I get to the final part, the Fenoderee story must be told now to give the proper perspective of the area. The story of how a mortal woman and a Fairy Prince meet and have a love affair in Glen Auldyn.

The woman, named Kitty Keruish, was wooed by an Otherworldly handsome man who she fell in love with. They used to meet at the Blue Rowan Tree in Glen Auldyn to be together in secret as Fairy and Mortals could not be or exist together according to tradition and this Fairy was of Royal blood and called himself “Udereek”.

He was supposed to attend a Manx Harvest home festival with all the other fairfolk at Glen Rushen across the other side of the Isle of Man. However, he did not as was meeting his lover at the Blue Rowan Tree. This was frowned upon by those of high ranking and to make an example he lost his status and was transformed into a half man- half goat. A Satyr or Pan like creature by the Fairy Council and left to roam forever in this form.

His lover had fled the Isle of Man to escape any form of retribution from the fairfolk or her own people. Now the Fenodree roamed the island alone and although in this form continued to be of help and assist humans in his hairy form: the wild man of the woods.

Several other stories have him assisting farmers and fisherman also in several other parts of the Island. There is one noteable crop-circle type deed with him stamping down the crop in fields like the Mowing Devil in the 1700’S. (Note…see the Fortean times for more info on the Mowing Devil!)

This very sad story puts the Fenoderee of Glen Auldyn right here in the Valley where he waits for his lost love timeless to him seeing watching and hiding in the wild places! Expect the Unexpected.

Taking a few pictures of the site before trying to get around the pool I noticed another mushroom ring much larger set on the embankment by the pool.

Getting down we noticed the immediate area under the trees was unusually darkened.

We could not see the hillside, just behind. The place had an eeriness to it, we felt as we were being watched by something.

No birdsong. The air was still, then a significant wind arose and we also heard something moving around in the dark area as twigs cracked. We both felt uneasy.

We were still a good way off being outside this wooded area and walked up to long deserted single story overgrown house, wondering if we had disturbed something. It didn’t feel right.

Thinking maybe we should turn around and go back now. I felt a bit strange as if I was being told to go back. A sense of panic set in. I felt a bit sick and dizzy. Head spinning. Feeling faint.

I stopped, took some more pictures, then quite suddenly a cold clammy wet feeling of something on my back which turned into icy cold spine chiller of ghoststories. What I did was try not to panic. I said to my friend “let’s go back now”, trying not to alarm her too much.

I took some photos of the area looking back at the area by the pool we just passed through. Then “we have got to go back and as quickly as possible”. I was getting some sort of transmitted message it seemed.

So back we went. It seemed to take a longer time as the path stretched out like was extending further, like the feeling when you run in a dream and the floor is like a reverse travellator.

Finally, we get back to steel white gate and get through, lock it down back on the B16 road by the end house. We carry on and stop outside the Church of St Fingan on the other side of the bridge river crossing. Here stop for breath, still feeling cold and shaken at what just happened.

My friend said “did you notice we were in a mist all the time there?”

“No” I said.

I told her why we needed to get out quick. It seemed it didn’t affect her the same.

On route back, we stopped to compare notes and write it all down. Some horses came over to us to say hello and we gave them some fresh long grass. This calmed me down.

“What was going to be on those photo’s?” I wondered.

There are two more stories that go together here.

Cloud of Darkness. – Seen by a woman going up Glen Auldyn one evening. Everything became black. She stood waiting for an hour but the cloud did not go away. She turned about to go back the way she had came to see the way down was still visible!

This happened above the bridge that was washed away (1931 flood?) some years earlier. This phenomena was also seen about 9.30pm half an hour before the woman’s experience.

A cottage stood back from the road where  a great cloud of darkness was seen. This could be the same cottage and area we experienced it, although the time was around midday.  Only later did I realise that some missing or extended time was also apparent in the experience. What should have been a 5-10 minute walk took half an hour.

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Milntown Corner crossroads: Haunt of the Moddhey -Dhoo.

One more story.

The Wild Hunt – An old deserted Mansion which was built over a fairy path was a frequent haunt of the Wild Hunt. Seen as lights on the Mountain side, and testified by older residents of the locality.

Usually on moonlit nights, and described with innumerable horses of every description with the cry of dogs breaking cover. They mirrored a human Hunting with the dress clothing etc of the time and year seen in.

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The muddy path and area of the experience looking up the Glen.

Conclusion – What did I come across? I don’t know as it was hidden in cloaking of darkness. The Fenoderee? Or something else you don’t want to meet: a Buggane?

The phenomena that turned me around and prevented my trip up to Snaefell also saved me and my friend from a severe weather storm that moved in over the mountain so maybe it was a friendly warning after all.

*

My most recent trip to Glen Auldyn was by myself. It was a good day and I experienced no strange encounters.

The area changed a few years back because people had taken over the derelict house right by where I had taken the particular photo (photo 8). They had renovated the house, and moved in as a family residence. The photo is currently published in this books by Janet Bord, ‘The Travellers Guide to Fairy Sites’ and mentioned in two other of her publications.

The whole atmosphere had gone. The refurbishment had spoilt the darkened embankment area. It was all torn up, and the hillside now easily visible!

I wondered if the family knew about the stories of the Glen, and if they would experience the similar things, eg Ghosts, Poltergeist, Wild Hunt, strange lights and the Fair Folk  being on a Fairy Path.

If I hadn’t had the strange feeling in that location I would have not taken the photo looking back. The roll of film I used was intact but, although I had taken a least three other shots there, it was as if the film had been rolled back as they were not on the negatives.

More missing time pixy-led confusion and things out of sync!

Had I encounted Pan in the wooded glade? The Fenoderee, with his cloaking device of darkness?

In terms of missing time: the 5-10 min walk from the gate and back took half an hour on the day I took the photo.

John –  Liverpool

Next time: We publish the series of photos John took on his fateful walk. Did he capture evidence of the Good People? Take a look at the photos and decide for yourself…

 

18 – Wee Pocket Podcast: 3 Tales of Faerie from the Sea

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Sit back and relax as Kitty shares 3 rare and engaging tales of Faerie from the Sea.

Listen to the tale of how a quick-witted and wickedly handsome man managed to escape the clutches of a lusty Mermaid.

Discover how one fella learned the hard way that you should never invade the privacy, or threaten to expose the identity, of a Merman.

selkie5 (2)And finally, see how one man’s act of kindness toward a Selkie came to save many lives.

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To read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience with Kitty at:

Email: glassonionstories@gmail.com 

Facebook: Encounters with the Good People

Instagram: Encounters with the Good People

 

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Credits:

Theme Music, ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo.

Mermaid Tale: read by Lynda.

Merman Tale: read by Simon.

17 – Household Faerie

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We look at 3 tales of encounters with Household Faerie.

The German “Kobold”, the Welsh “Bwbachod”, the Scottish “Brownie”. And find they are much more than just a helping hand. Some might even say they are more trouble than they’re worth…..

Kitty reminds you, as always, why it’s okay to believe in Faeries.

To read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience visit:

Email: glassonionstories@gmail.com 

Facebook: Encounters with the Good People

Instagram: Encounters with the Good People

 

Credits:
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo
‘Galway’ by Kevin McLeod. From Royalty Free Zone.
“The Wind That Shakes The Barley_The Reel With The Beryle”, by The Chieftains
Brownie story read by Zornaph. www.fiverr.com/zornaph/

16 – Bloody May: Will o’Wisp, Red Cap and Sluagh

Faerie of traditional Celtic Faerie Folklore are old and clever, and sometimes bloodthirsty.

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It is long known the Good People are more active in the month of May. Until they tell us themselves, we can only speculate why this is so but… we are wise to be wary, for not all Faerie wish to act as Guardian, or Muse, or kindly foretell a death at any time.

And in the month of May, there are those who would gladly steal your blood or even your life.

We look at 2 tales of encounters with Faerie in the month of May which show us how easily they are tempted by a lovely lady and how swift, and final, is their reckoning when a promise is broken. The line twixt life and death is fine indeed…

This episode features 3 particularly dangerous Faerie: the Will o’Wisp, Red Cap and Sluagh.

These are three fellas you do not want to bump into at any time, but in the month of May,

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that bump would surely turn deadly. But fear not, we have some tips on how you might save yourself from their wicked whimsies.

Kitty reminds you not to be tempted to go Faerie Spotting in the month of May and as always, explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries.

To read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience visit:

Email: glassonionstories@gmail.com 

Facebook: Encounters with the Good People

Instagram: Encounters with the Good People

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Credits:
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo

Additional Music: ‘Caoineadh Cu Chulainn’ written by Bill Whelan from the album ‘Riverdance’, 1997. Performed by Davy Spillane.

‘Sweet Little Lullaby’ by Darren Curtis. From Royalty Free Zone.
‘Ghost’ by Tim Beek. From Royalty Free Zone.

Anecdote collected by Scottish author John Francis Campbell in 1862. Read by Zornaph. www.fiverr.com/zornaph/

Poem ‘Will o’Wisp’, published in Scottish Broadsheet in 1869. Read by Greyolltwit.
Tale ‘The Fairy Rath’, collected by Lady Wilde in 1887. Read by Greyolltwit.

Additional Music: ‘Raggle Taggle Gyspy’ performed by Plantxy. Live at Vicar Street, 2004.

15 – Beltane and the Month of Faerie Madness

beltane (2)What do you get when you take a pinch of Beltane and add a dash of Faerie?

A Month of May Mischief.

Faerie of traditional Irish Faerie Folklore are old and clever, and something strange comes over them in the month of May.

Did you know that in the month of May you are more likely to be assaulted, abducted, seduced or tricked by Faerie than at any other time of the year?

It’s true, and Kitty is wondering why!

We know the Good People, Wee Folk, Faerie or Sidhe are all around us and watching, always watching.

And so it is they watch us celebrate birth and mourn death and the many landmarks twixt the two.beltane3 (2)

But what do the Good People think when they witness us collectively throw off our tightly held inhibitions, ditch our clothing, paint our bodies, adorn them in flowers and branches, beat drums and dance around bonfires?

Are they amused?

Probably, but they are most certainly confused.

Beltane, the Celtic ceremony of welcoming Summer and celebrating the warmth of the Sun and the fertility and hope it brings, is held on 30th April, and it is no coincidence that from 1st May, Faerie go a little… wild.

beast (4)Kitty has some ideas why, warns against Faerie Spotting in the month of May and as always, explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries.

To read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience visit:

Email: glassonionstories@gmail.com 

Facebook: Encounters with the Good People

Instagram: Encounters with the Good People

Credits:
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo
Additional Music: ‘Birdsong in Spring’ by Sounds Majestic.
Additional Music: ‘Carousel’ by Free Video Library.
‘A Chant for Beltane’ poem, written by Doreen Valiente, read by Dreow Bennett from the DVD, ‘Charge of the Goddess’.
‘Going Home – Theme from Local Hero’, written and performed by Mark Knopfler from the album ‘Local Hero’ soundtrack, 1983.

14 – Selkie: Still Waters Run Deep

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Come, join Kitty and bask under the warm glow of the doe-eyed Selkie.

selkie yearning3 (3)The Selkie story is a familiar one: under the light of the moon, a beautiful woman with milky white skin, long brown hair and big brown eyes, dances on the rocky shore.

A canny man steals her sealskin and she is evermore bound to live on land, to be his wife and bear his children.

She is a fine wife, a loving mother and, although she spends every spare moment gazing out at sea and talking to seagulls, theirs is a good life.

 

NUTS TO THAT!

It’s time to wipe the misty romanticism from our eyes and take a real look at Selkie. Her predicament is no fairytale.

Faerie of traditional Folklore are old, clever and can shed their skin whole. They are all around us, always watching. But what are they thinking? Do they yearn to befriend us?

It is said “still waters run deep” and so it is with Selkie, the ‘feel-good’ member of the Good People.

Kitty takes a close look at these romanticised creatures to discover the fascinating character bubbling beneath those soft brown eyes. You might be surprised to find we have plenty in common with the creatures who have long dwelled in the waters off Scotland and Ireland.scotland selkie2

In this episode we ponder:

  • the true nature of the Selkie
  • the shocking methods used to treat webbed hands and feet of those descended from a Selkie-Human union
  • one rare occasion of Selkie revenge
  • and tips on where best to spot Selkie.

As always, Kitty explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries and invites you to read more true tales of encounters with the Good People and share your own experiences at:

Email: glassonionstories@gmail.com 

 

Facebook: Encounters with the Good People

Instagram: Encounters with the Good People

 

Credits:
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo.
Poem adapted from ‘The Mermaid Song’ written by James Reeves. Read by Owen.
Poem adapted from ‘Tell me, tell me, Sarah Jane’ written by Charles Causley. Read by Carol.
‘The Great Silkie of Sules Skerry’ – Traditional. Performed by Maddy Prior from the album ‘Collections’, 2005.
Additional Music: ‘Sea Waves’ by superfunnysheet

13 – Mermaids and Mermen: Is it Safe to go in the Water?

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Leave your towels on the beach and join Kitty as she dives into the dark, scary waters where dwell Mermaids and Mermen. What do we know about these elusive creatures?

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We know they are spotted in waters all over the world – check!

They are ridiculously good looking – check!

They are shiny and muscular – check!

But… we don’t know what darkness lurks in their hearts.

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In this episode, we ponder:

Why Mermaids attack underwater divers?

merrow baskets (2)How to defeat a Scottish Mermen without getting wet

Why Scandinavian fishers should carry an extra sock when out at sea

and the bizarre hobby of the, otherwise delightful, Irish Merrow.

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Faerie of traditional Folklore are old, clever and can live in water and on land. They are all around us, always watching. But what are they thinking? Are they on a mission to keep us landlubbers out of the oceans altogether?mermaid merman (2)

Kitty makes a splash by declaring Mermen are every bit as interesting as their prettier kin, and warns against listening to the Mermaids sweet song, those girls are fierce!

As always, Kitty explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries and invites you to read more true tales of encounters with the Good People and share your own experiences at:

Email: glassonionstories@gmail.com 

Facebook: Encounters with the Good People

Instagram: Encounters with the Good People

Credits:

Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo.
Additional Music: ‘Sunny Sailor Boy’ written by Mike Scott. Performed by Luka Blooom from the album ‘Turf’- 1994
Additional Music: ‘Sea Waves’ by superfunnysheet