55 – Faerie Cats

cat in tree (2)

Curled up by the fire, or slipping silently through the streets, sleek, sensual, smart and so wonderfully, wonderfully pretty.

Cats.

If there is any creature to enjoy the company of the Good People, to understand their charm, their unpredictability and their wild nature, it is surely the cat.

Over the ages, many folk have believed that cats are actually Faeries in disguise. Or, if not Faeries themselves, to enjoy some form of alliance with the Good People.

Cats spend years watching us, observing our strange habits, our plans, beliefs and rituals.

What do you think they do with all that information?

cat 4 arthur rackham
by Arthur Rackham

Do they report back to the Good People?

Through poem, lyrics and tales, Kitty ponders if there is more to the humble cat than meets the eye and asks:

Are they Faerie?

Are they spies?

Or could they act as mediator between the Good People and ourselves?

You’ll never look at a cat the same way…

*

cat arthur rackham
by Arthur Rackham

 

Fancy buying me a coffee?

If you would like to support my hard work, simply click on the ‘Buy me a coffee’ icon on my website and you will be helping to create and produce ‘Encounters with the Good People’ Podcast and YouTube videos.

All support is greatly appreciated.

Cheers, Kitty.

*

Need more Encounters with the Good People?

You are cordially invited to join Encounters with the Good People’ on YouTube. You are our guest, don’t bring a thing, just yourself. Simply sit back and soak in our ‘lovely, moody, charming videos’ as described by viewer James. (Thank you James!).

If you enjoy our videos as much as James, please Like, Subscribe and Share with like-minded folk.

For a daily peek at modern and historical encounters with the Good People, plus loads of great links, conversation starters and otherwise hard-to-find information on the Good People, visit Kitty’s Facebook page:

Or, for a dose of Faerie on the go, drop into Kitty’s ‘Faerie Lucky Dip’ over at Instagram. Kitty posts once a day and you never know what you might get. Faerie top tips, fun facts, art, poems, and short tales.

Do you have your own tale of a Faerie sighting or encounter?
Perhaps you have your own story to share?

Kitty would love to hear from you and share your tale on our website.

Our website is bursting with true, and incredible, tales of encounters with the Good People from folk all over the world. You’re sure to find a tale there to get you thinking… Thanks to everyone who has shared their own experiences with us so far.

cat jakub rozalski
by Jakub Rozalski.

Podcast credits
Edited by Magic Dan.
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio di Campo.
Additional Music: ‘Sneaky Snitch’, ‘Sneaky Adventure’, ‘The Sky of our Ancestors’, ‘Parting of the Ways Part 2’ and ‘Pride’ by Kevin Macleod.
Tales from: duchas.ie
‘Ancient Legends, Mystic Charms, and Superstitions of Ireland’ by Lady Francesca Speranza Wilde. 1887.
Abridged ‘Love Cats’ written by Robert Smith. From the album ‘Japanese Whispers’, 1983. Read by Simone.
‘Sean O’Conaills Book: Stories and Traditions from Iveragh’. 1981.
‘Twinkletoes’ poem by A. A. Milne. Read by Emkay.

Youtube video 16 – Will o’Wisp, Red Cap and Sluagh

Faerie of traditional Celtic Faerie Folklore are old and clever, and sometimes bloodthirsty.

It is long known the Good People are more active in the month of May. Until they tell us themselves, we can only speculate why this is so but… we are wise to be wary, for not all Faerie wish to act as Guardian, or Muse, or kindly foretell a death at any time.

And in the month of May, there are those who would gladly steal your blood or even your life.

We look at 2 tales of encounters with Faerie in the month of May which show us how easily they are tempted by a lovely lady and how swift, and final, is their reckoning when a promise is broken. The line twixt life and death is fine indeed…

This episode features 3 particularly dangerous Faerie: the Will o’Wisp, Red Cap and Sluagh.

These are three fellas you do not want to bump into at any time, but in the month of May, that bump would surely turn deadly. But fear not, we have some tips on how you might save yourself from their wicked whimsies.

Kitty reminds you not to be tempted to go Faerie Spotting in the month of May and as always, explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries.

To read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience visit:

www.encounterswiththegoodpeople.com
glassonionstories@gmail.com
www.facebook.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople

Credits:
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo
Additional Music: ‘Caoineadh Cu Chulainn’ written by Bill Whelan from the album ‘Riverdance’, 1997. Performed by Davy Spillane.
‘Sweet Little Lullaby’ by Darren Curtis. From Royalty Free Zone.
‘Ghost’ by Tim Beek. From Royalty Free Zone.
Anecdote collected by Scottish author John Francis Campbell in 1862. Read by Zornaph. www.fiverr.com/zornaph/
Poem ‘Will o’Wisp’, published in Scottish Broadsheet in 1869. Read by Greyolltwit.
Tale ‘The Fairy Rath’, collected by Lady Wilde in 1887. Read by Greyolltwit.

Faerie Music in a Cedar Grove.

cedar trees

I was with a friend. We were high atop Mount Fernan of the Rockies, way beyond cell-service range, in a grove of ancient cedar trees.

We were sitting beneath a massive cedar tree, besides a stream, and we asked the Faeries to join us. We sat for quite awhile, talking and laughing, when suddenly we heard this lovely ethereal music, very jovial and celebratory!

It seemed as close as the other side of the stream, but I did not see any entities. It was just the loveliest, most wonderful music.

– Rachael.

ida rentoul outhwaite music
By Ida Rentoul Outhwaite.

 

 

54 – The Death Coach

death coach 2

No one wants to see a death coach.

Even to see the back of it, riding past your house, or leaving town is no great comfort, for the mere passing of the Death Coach is a sign of an impending death.

death coach 4 (2)

But that’s not all… the Death Coach also transports the body or spirit of those who have already passed.

You will hear long before you see it.

Clanking wheels, cracking whips, rattling chains and stamping hooves, the Death Coach barrels down narrow lanes and dark roads on darkest nights.

Most who hear the Death Coach approach scuttle themselves behind closed doors and latched windows.

But what can you do if you find yourself stranded outside?

On this week’s episode, Kitty shares tips on how to avoid the Death Coach and gives fair warning on what you might find if you dare to open the coach door and take a peek inside…

Fancy more Encounters with the Good People?

You are cordially invited to join ‘Encounters with the Good People’ on YouTube. You are our guest, don’t bring a thing, just yourself.

Simply sit back and soak in our ‘lovely, moody, charming videos’ as described by viewer James. (Thank you James!).

If you enjoy our videos as much as James, please Like, Subscribe and Share with like-minded folk.

For a daily peek at modern and historical encounters with the Good People, plus loads of great links, conversation starters and otherwise hard-to-find information on the Good People, visit Kitty’s Facebook page

Or, for a dose of Faerie on the go, drop into Kitty’s ‘Faerie Lucky Dip’ over at Instagram. Kitty posts once a day and you never know what you might get. Faerie top tips, fun facts, art, poems, and short tales.

Do you have your own tale of a Faerie sighting or encounter?   Perhaps you have your own story to share?

Kitty would love to hear from you and share your tale on our website.

Our website is bursting with true, and amazing, tales of encounters with the Good People from folk all over the world. You’re sure to find a tale there to get you thinking… Thanks to everyone who has shared their own experiences with us so far. www.encounterswiththegoodpeople.com

Podcast Credits.
Edited by Magic Dan.
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio di Campo
Additional Music: ‘Ghost Processional’, ‘Atlantean Twilight’, ‘Wounded’ by Kevin Macleod.
‘Cloudy’ by Vladimir Khrobystov
‘Horror’ by Marc v/d Meulen
Tales from: Duchas.ie
‘True Irish Ghost Stories’ by St. John D. Seymour and Harry L. Neligan, 1914.
‘Fairy Legends and Tradition’s by Thomas Crofton Croker, 1825.
‘British Folklore’ by Wirt Sikes. Reading by Librivox.
‘Fairy Faith in the Celtic Countries’ by Evans-Wentz. 1911.

2 Faerie Encounters from Latvia

Hearing mournful Faerie music.

My own experience is not too long or complicated, it is about music, coming from nowhere.

arthur rackham music

Several times as a child and once, very briefly, as an adult I have heard someone playing a sad tune on some kind of woodwind instrument in places, where you wouldn’t expect to find musicians at all (in the woods), or at least not playing such tunes (at the zoo full of kids).

The tune was, as I said, quite sad, tearful even and I heard it while looking at the scenes, one could describe as desolate: an abandoned construction project at the zoo, poorly cut clearing with stumps and branches all over the place. That was in my childhood. jean baptiste monge4 (3)

Recently, after all these years, I heard the music again.

Very briefly – just ten seconds at best – but it brought back the memories at once.

I am sure it was same low woodwind (a clarinet, perhaps) and on the sad, misty, rainy November afternoon.

And again, it was in the countryside – hardly any street musicians there.

What’s funny about it all – mysterious music is not a major part of either Russian, or Latvian folklore, on the other hand, both traditions say that supernatural entities have lives of their own, with their weddings and funerals, which implies music.

Perhaps, a fairy musician was expressing his sorrow at the sight of abandoned or poorly done work (Russian fairies rejoice at human diligence and are angered by neglect).

Also, I learned that the place, where I heard the music last time as an adult was a battlefield in both great wars (and not too small at that – a metal detectorist friend of mine says the ground there sings from all the metal – bullets, spent casings, shell fragments)… Appropriate place to play a sad tune.

*

An Encounter with a Leshy?

breakfast

One summer morning, when I was in my early teens, my father sat at the breakfast table.

He said that, just that morning ,he met a man dressed as if he just got out of bed – slightly disheveled, wearing a t-shirt, shorts and flip-flops, who came out of the woods asking, where he was.

The man seemed distressed, but quite sober, so my dad told him and the man was shocked when he learned that he is a full train stop away from his home.

Then the man told what had happened: as he was having his morning smoke, he decided to pop into the woods just across the lane from his house, which is not that uncommon.forest mushroom

Picking wild mushrooms is a popular activity and many people do just that – briefly search the edge of the woods before breakfast in hopes of finding half a dozen – enough to make a small bowl of sauce for dinner (those, who want to get more mushrooms go into the woods better equipped, covering as much of the body as the weather allows for fear of ticks and disease they can carry).

He found nothing and walked back. And walked… and then the woods became unfamiliar, and then he went out of the woods, where he saw unfamiliar houses and met my dad.

The man asked, where the train station was and went away, cursing and mumbling about not having any money and having to explain it all to his wife. There could, of course, be any number of rational explanations, perhaps the man was not as sober after all and just lost his way and the track of time, but someone familiar with Russian fairy lore can also suspect the work a Leshy – woodland spirit and lord of the woods (“a” is intentional – every forest has one, big forests have multiple, new forest will eventually have a new keeper move in).

leshy

Leshy is a largely benevolent entity, know to help people (it is said that if an ill baby suddenly falls silent, Leshy is sitting beside the bad comforting the baby and praying for recovery), but as with most fairy creatures, is easily offended, or can just be in a bad mood.

Then, he can play mean pranks on humans, his favorite is confusing a person, making him or her loose a sense of direction and go the wrong way even in familiar places (lose one’s way among three pine trees, as the saying goes), but he can also lure a person deep into the woods by calling in a familiar voices, or transporting a person to a different place altogether, which seemed to have happened here.

What offends a Leshy? forest rubbish

First of all, disrespect for the woods – shouting on top of your lungs, unless in distress, breaking branches as you go, littering (and our unfortunate man smoked, as you remember, perhaps threw a cigarette butt away) and so on.

Treading on Leshy’s favorite track through the forest is even more offensive to him, but this usually invites a more immediate and violent reaction, up to and including sudden gusts of wind lifting a person from the ground.

leshy2

Maybe, the man offended lord of the woods somehow, or may be it was just one of those days, when Leshy felt like pranking an unfortunate soul.

Or maybe, there is a mundane explanation, who knows…

– Edgar, Latvia.

 

 

53 – Beware the Stray Sod

vintage-1722329(1)

Mind how you go, lest you step your foot upon a Stray Sod.

This week, Kitty tackles the phenomena of the ‘Stray Sod’: an area of ground within a field which is affected/charmed/marked in some way by the Good People.

Anybody can be struck by the Stray Sod.

stray sod (2)

No matter if a person has walked the same field, or the same path every day of their life, if they stand on a Stray Sod under the darkness of night, will suddenly find themselves lost and entirely disoriented.

Some folk find their way out by chance.

Others, who lived to tell the tale, are led to the brink of deadly accident.

Most are trapped within the field until dawn finds them, distraught and exhausted.

Is this just a case of Faerie pranksters? Playing practical jokes on Humans to entertain themselves?

Could it be a method used to punish or seek revenge on Humans who have wronged the Good People?

Or, is their motivation more complex?

Could it be the Good People trap a person until dawn for to keep them from their destination?

Do they have the ability to foresee a future event, and if so, are they helping or hindering the person by trapping them?

Curiouser and curiouser…

This week, we take a closer peek at the multifaceted nature of the Good People.

Fancy more Encounters with the Good People?

Don’t forget to drop into the ‘Encounters with the Good People’ channel on YouTube, sit back with a cuppa and enjoy our lovely Podcast videos. If you enjoy our videos, please Like, Subscribe and Share with like-minded folk.

For a daily peek at modern and historical encounters with the Good People, plus loads of great links, conversation starters and otherwise hard-to-find information on the Good People, visit Kitty’s Facebook page

Or, for a dose of Faerie on the go, drop into Kitty’s ‘Lucky Dip’ over at Instagram. Kitty posts once a day and you never know what you might get. Faerie top tips, fun facts, art, poems, and short tales.

Do you have your own tale of a Faerie sighting or encounter?

Perhaps you have your own story to share?

Kitty would love to hear from you and share your tale on our website.

Our Website is bursting with true, and truly incredible, tales of encounters with the Good People from folk all over the world. You’re sure to find a tale there to get you thinking… Thanks to everyone who has shared their own experiences with us so far.

Eddie Lenihan: YouTube Channel
Eddie Lenihan: Facebook Page

 

Podcast Credits.
Edited by Magic Dan.
Tales from duchas.ie

Theme Music:
‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio di Campo.

Additional Music:
‘Jazharr’ by Royalty Free Music.
‘Traveler’ by Alexander Nakarada.
‘Fairytale’ by Jonathan Segev.

Youtube video 15 – Beltane and the Month of Faerie Madness

What do you get when you take a pinch of Beltane and add a dash of Faerie?

A Month of May Mischief.

Faerie of traditional Irish Faerie Folklore are old and clever, and something strange comes over them in the month of May.

Did you know that in the month of May you are more likely to be assaulted, abducted, seduced or tricked by Faerie than at any other time of the year? It’s true, and Kitty is wondering why!

We know the Good People, Wee Folk, Faerie or Sidhe are all around us and watching, always watching. And so it is they watch us celebrate birth and mourn death and the many landmarks twixt the two.

But what do the Good People think when they witness us collectively throw off our tightly held inhibitions, ditch our clothing, paint our bodies, adorn them in flowers and branches, beat drums and dance around bonfires?

Are they amused? Probably, but they are most certainly confused.

Beltane, the Celtic ceremony of welcoming Summer and celebrating the warmth of the Sun and the fertility and hope it brings, is held on 30th April, and it is no coincidence that from 1st May, Faerie go a little wild.

Kitty has some ideas why, warns against Faerie Spotting in the month of May and as always, explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries.

To read more stories of encounters with the Good People, share your own story of an encounter, perhaps one handed down through your family, or just an unusual experience visit:

www.encounterswiththegoodpeople.com
glassonionstories@gmail.com
www.facebook.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople

Credits:
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo
Additional Music: ‘Birdsong in Spring’ by Sounds Majestic.
Additional Music: ‘Carousel’ by Free Video Library.
‘A Chant for Beltane’ poem, written by Doreen Valiente, read by Dreow Bennett from the DVD, ‘Charge of the Goddess’.

52 – The Leprechaun

leprechaun jean baptiste monge
‘Leprechaun’ by Jean Baptiste Monge

I don’t believe in Leprechauns!

There I said it, what a relief…

Actually, I do believe in a Leprechaun, only not the stereotypical figure who appears on every street, in every store window and, bewilderingly, to represent Ireland on Saint Patrick’s Day. leprechaun 2 (2)

The Leprechaun of our popular culture is a hopeless, wishy-washy and lazy misrepresentation of the true Leprechaun.

So… leave all pre-conceived ideas and images of the Leprechaun behind.

In this episode, we take a genuine look at the member of the Good People who has come to be known as the ‘Leprechaun’.

Through poem and stories, we will discover the Leprechaun is a formidable Faerie, one who favours some Humans over others and one you most decidedly do not want to offend or injure! An encounter with this Faerie can change your life…

Fancy more Encounters with the Good People?

Don’t forget to drop into the Encounters with the Good People channel on YouTube, sit back with a cuppa and enjoy our lovely Podcast videos. Don’t forget to Subscribe and Like.

For a daily peek at modern and historical encounters with the Good People, plus loads of great links, conversation starters and otherwise hard-to-find information on the Good People, visit Kitty’s Facebook page.

Or, for a dose of Faerie on the go, drop into Kitty’s ‘Faerie Lucky Dip’ over at Instagram Kitty posts once a day and you never know what you might get. Faerie top tips, fun facts, art, poems, and short tales.

Do you have your own tale of a Faerie sighting or encounter?

Perhaps you have your own story to share?

Kitty would love to hear from you and share your tale on our website.

Our Website is bursting with true, and amazing, tales of encounters with the Good People from folk all over the world. You’re sure to find a tale there to get you thinking… Thanks to everyone who has shared their own experiences with us so far.

Podcast Credits

Edited by Magic Dan

Abridged poem ‘The Leprechaun’ by William Allington. Read by thegirlwhotalks.

Two tales from ‘Ancient Legends, Mystic Charms, and Superstitions of Ireland’ by Lady Francesca Speranza Wilde, 1887.

Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio di Campo

Additional Music:
‘Clear Air’, ‘Angevin’ and ‘Heavy Heart’ by Kevin Macleod.
‘Red Haired Boy’ by Royalty Free Music.

51 – Reverend Robert Kirk and Second Sight

a second sight

 

 

robert kirk grave
Rev. Robert Kirk’s Grave.

 

Reverend Robert Kirk.

Born – December 1644, Aberfoyle, Scotland.

Died – Taken by the Good People: May 1692, Aberfoyle, Scotland.

 

 

 

Rev Kirk, also known as ‘The Fairy Minister’ was blessed (or cursed) with the skill of ‘Second Sight’.

Second Sight allows a person to see, hear or interact with the Good People, and in some cases, bestows the person with great skills of healing.

robert kirk book

For Kirk, this led to an intense fascination with the Faerie of the highlands and lowlands of Scotland. Such so, it came to dominate his life, and some say, cause, his death.

Others argue he has never died. But still, to this day, dwells among the Good People.

On this week’s Podcast, Kitty takes a look at the strange life and mysterious death of Rev Robert Kirk and ponders:

Did the Good People kill him in retaliation for him sharing their secrets?

Did the Good People invite him to join them?

Is Second Sight all its cracked up to be?

Join Kitty to find out all this and much more!

Fancy more Encounters with the Good People?

For a daily peek at modern and historical encounters with the Good People, plus loads of great links, conversation starters and otherwise hard-to-find information on the Good People, visit Kitty’s Facebook page:

Or, for a dose of Faerie on the go, drop into Kitty’s ‘Faerie Lucky Dip’ over at Instagram. Kitty posts once a day and you never know what you might get. Faerie top tips, fun facts, art, poems, and short tales.

Hey! Your eyes work hard for you, isn’t it time to give them a treat?! Drop into ‘Encounters with the Good People’ channel on YouTube and feast your eyes on our lovely Podcast videos. Don’t forget to Subscribe and Like.

Who doesn’t like to read a great tale? Our website is bursting with true, and amazing, tales of encounters with the Good People from folk all over the world. You’re sure to find a tale there to get you thinking… Thanks to everyone who has shared their own experiences with us so far.

Podcast Credits.
Edited by Magic Dan
‘A Dedication to Kirk’ by Andrew Lang, 1893. Read by Simone.

Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio di Campo.

Additional Music:
‘Private reflection’ by Kevin Macleod.
‘Highland Castle’ by Darren Curtis
‘Quiet Place’ by Jonyy Easton
‘Hidden Past’ by Kevin Macleod.
‘Countryside’ by Audio Library.
‘Wooden Legs’ by David and Goliath.
‘Banish Misfortune’ by Brigan.

Youtube video 14 – Selkie

Selkie – Still Waters Run Deep.

Come, join Kitty and bask under the warm glow of the doe-eyed Selkie.

The Selkie story is a familiar one: under the light of the moon, a beautiful woman with milky white skin, long brown hair and big brown eyes, dances on the rocky shore. A canny man steals her sealskin and she is evermore bound to live on land, to be his wife and bear his children. She is a fine wife, a loving mother and, although she spends every spare moment gazing out at sea and talking to seagulls, theirs is a good life.

NUTS TO THAT!

It’s time to wipe the misty romanticism from our eyes and take a real look at Selkie. Her predicament is no fairytale.

Faerie of traditional Folklore are old, clever and can shed their skin whole. They are all around us, always watching. But what are they thinking? Do they yearn to befriend us?

It is said “still waters run deep” and so it is with Selkie, the ‘feel-good’ member of the Good People.

Kitty takes a close look at these romanticised creatures to discover the fascinating character bubbling beneath those soft brown eyes. You might be surprised to find we have plenty in common with the creatures who have long dwelled in the waters off Scotland and Ireland.

In this episode we ponder:

the true nature of the Selkie
the shocking methods used to treat webbed hands and feet of those descended from a Selkie-Human union.
one rare occasion of Selkie revenge
and tips on where best to spot Selkie.

As always, Kitty explains why it’s okay to believe in Faeries and invites you to read more true tales of encounters with the Good People and share your own experiences at:

www.encounterswiththegoodpeople.com
glassonionstories@gmail.com
www.instagram.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople
www.facebook.com/encounterswiththegoodpeople

Credits:
Theme Music: ‘Irish Coffee’ by Giorgio Di Campo.
Poem adapted from ‘The Mermaid Song’ written by James Reeves. Read by Owen.
Poem adapted from ‘Tell me, tell me, Sarah Jane’ written by Charles Causley. Read by Carol.
Additional Music: ‘Sea Waves’ by superfunnysheet